Australia

20,763 total products were found covering Australia.
Next, select filters, series, and products from the sections below the map.

Responsibility for the topographic and cadastral survey of Australia is divided between federal and state government agencies. Until 1950 there was very little national coordination between the different state surveys. After that date federal and state maps have all been produced on the UTM projection with the Australian Map Grid, and since 1973 all major producers have adopted metric standards. Official mapping relates to the Australian Geodetic Datum 1984, but moves are in hand to change to the Geocentric Datum of Australia (GDA) as the reference datum for all spatial data and map products. The period from 1965 to the close of the 1980s saw a very large effort devoted to the completion of basic scale mapping of the continent, Australia being the last inhabited continent to be mapped to modern standards. Increasingly in the 1990s the private sector became involved in the compilation and production of basic data, and digital capture of data sets to common continental standards. The Australian Surveying and Land Information Group (AUSLIG) was a business unit of the Commonwealth Department of Administrative Services until 1997, when responsibility passed to the Department of Industry, Science and Tourism. It is currently responsible for Commonwealth mapping, surveying and land information in Australia, including the publication of hard copy and digital maps, and provision of mapping to other government departments. AUSLIG acts as the Commonwealth focal point for the development of a national spatial data infrastructure. It was formed in 1988, after the merger of the former Division of National Mapping and the Australian Survey Office. Other small and medium scale federal topographic mapping of Australia was the responsibility of the Royal Australian Survey Corps (RASvy), which was disbanded in 1996 ─ military map and chart production are now carried out under Defence commercial support arrangements, RASvy residual functions are carried out by the Royal Australian Engineers, and standards and specifications are now fixed by the Directorate of Military Geographic Information. AUSLIG maintains the national official basic maps at 1:100,000 and 1:250,000 scales, which were redesignated as the (NATMAP series) in 1995. The 1:100,000 (NATMAP topographic map series) program was started in 1968 and was originally intended to cover the whole country in 3,065 seven-color maps by 1975. However this aim was scaled down to full color mapping of inhabited areas and areas of potential resource development, a total of 1,591 sheets. The remaining 1,474 sheets in the less settled interior were only taken as far as compilation plots, and from 1972 these maps have been available as orthophoto mapping. The last published sheet in the full specification was completed in 1986, while the last orthophoto compilation sheet in the interior was finished in 1988; little revision of these maps has been carried out. The whole of Australia is covered in the 1:250,000 scale (NATMAP topographic map series). Each map is derived from six 1:100,000 scale maps or orthophoto plots, the series was compiled as a joint AUSLIG and RASvy publication, editions being available either as a Joint Operations Graphic (JOG) military specification, or a conventional AUSLIG version. The 1.5° X 1° sheets have 50 m contours and hill shading. The last of the 540 sheets in the new series was published in 1988, but little revision work is being carried out. Larger scale topographic surveys have been carried out by different state mapping agencies, and sometimes by RASvy. Scales and coverages vary from state to state. Smaller scale topographic mapping is also carried out by AUSLIG. 1:1,000,000 scale coverage complying with the International map of the World (IMW) specifications and covering Australia in 49 sheets was withdrawn following the AUSLIG merger, but sheet lines are still used by several thematic series and in commercially published atlases. Soviet military topographic mapping of Australia exists at the following scales: 1:1,000,000 (56 sheets, complete coverage published 1973-1977); 1:500,000 (160 sheets, complete coverage, published 1964-1975) and city (1:25,000) topographic mapping of Adelaide, Brisbane, Canberra, Perth and Sydney published between 1981 and 1985. These products are available in print, digital raster and digital vector GIS formats from East View Geospatial. State organizations The last decade has seen a proliferation of different kinds of state-based organization concerned with the production of spatial databases and mapping to cover their particular states and organizational remits; a very great diversification from the 1970s and 1980s standard of a state mapping agency based in a lands department. All manner of agencies are now engaged in mapping activities, but the importance of larger scale standardized map series production in the different states has declined. In contrast the emphasis has shifted to coordination between the different agencies to ensure the provision of compatible data sets, with particular attention increasingly being paid to Web-based metadata interfaces, and to specific user-driven mapping programs. Cooperation between agencies takes place under the aegis of the Australia and New Zealand Land Information Council (ANZLIC) and the Intergovernmental Committee on Surveying and Mapping (ICSM) attached to AUSLIG. Cadastral, urban and earth science mapping continues to be undertaken by state agencies, and it is the mineral exploration sector which has seen the most active data collection and publication programs over the last decade. Australian Capital Territory Large scale mapping of the Capital Territory was established by the Australian Survey Office in 1972. It was responsible for the compilation of a number of topographic and cadastral map series covering the territory at scales between 1:2 500 and 1:25 000. The ACT Land Information Center (ACTLIC) within Planning and Land Management is now ACT's lead agency for the capture, management and dissemination of land information. Urban areas are covered in topographic and orthophoto series, but these maps have been superseded by digital data sets held in the ACTMAP land information system, which is linked to attribute textual cadastral data in the Planning and lease manager relational database. Since 1992 ACTMAP has evolved from being a digital cadastral database, into a comprehensive and very current land information system, held as a distributed database and supporting many planning and land administration functions in the ACT government. Fourteen graphical database themes are used for mapping purposes by the ACT Mapping Office within ACTLIC, and each year a hard copy version of the database is published as the Canberra by suburbs atlas. The digital map data from ACTMAP comprises five major interrelated themes: street address, administrative geographies, urban and rural cadastral boundaries and a roads database. Other data sets include water features, 40 m gridded terrain data, various utilities data and a topographic database. Other smaller scale mapping of ACT is issued by AUSLIG including a single-sheet 1:100,000 scale topographic map, a LANDSAT TM satellite image map coverage of the territory, and an image poster of Canberra. AGSO publishes geological and hydrogeological mapping of the Capital Territory. New South Wales The most important state mapping agency in New South Wales is the Land Information Centre (LIC) in the Department of Conservation and Land Management. LIC was established as the Central Mapping Agency (CMA) in 1947, relocated to Bathurst in the 1970s and by 1988 had completed standard map coverage of the State, comprising 1:4,000 scale cadastral coverage of urban areas, 1:25,000 scale mapping of the more densely populated eastern seaboard, (including recent parallel image mapping of areas between Sydney and Newcastle), 1:50,000 scale mapping of the central band of the state and 1:100,000 scale maps of the more sparsely populated western areas. These maps conform to Commonwealth mapping standards and are on the UTM projection. LIC also publishes small scale touring maps, 23 town and district maps, five waterways maps and six national park maps, as well as smaller scale maps of the state as a whole and an official indexed road directory of New South Wales. LIC has been at the forefront of state digital developments in the 1990s, and unlike most other state land and mapping agencies has been actively involved in overseas technical aid projects, in a number of Southeast Asian and Pacific nations. Digital data sets are held in a state-wide digital cadastral database, with topographic coverages maintained in a digital topographic database. Digital terrain data for all the areas mapped at 1:25,000 and 1:50,000 scales, customized slope and aspect maps are generated from this data. Northern Territory The Department of Lands Planning and the Environment (NTDLPE) is the territorial mapping agency. Queensland The most important surveying and mapping organization in Queensland is the Department of Natural Resources (QDNR) which was created in February 1996 following the merger of the previous Department of Lands with components of the Department of Primary Industries (QDPI). The Department of Lands had itself only been established in 1989 following a merger of four constituent bodies, including the Department of Surveying and Mapping. QDNR continues to be the principal agency in the state carrying out topographic mapping, and acts as the cadastral mapping agency for the state. It also instituted an integrated state-wide Land Information Strategy, to maximize benefit from different government digital land information databases. QDNR's current topographic production concentrates upon a program of 1:25,000 scale mapping. Data are captured from aerial coverage, and an active digital mapping program is generating hard copy true-color ortho-image maps, with some limited line enhancement, including 5 m contours, roads, the UTM grid and place names. About 500 sheets are available. Other new mapping is in, digital orthophoto mapping programs of 1:2,500 and 1:5,000 scales, carried out in the mid 1990s, for urban local authorities, chiefly in the southeastern parts of the state. The Resource Information Group of the Department for Environment Heritage and Aboriginal Affairs (DEHAA) is the state mapping agency responsible for collection and provision of data relating to South Australia's land resources. Its standard mapping program includes hard copy topographic, cadastral and scale-corrected orthophotomaps for urban and closely settled areas, with the more remote parts of the state mapped in uncorrected photomaps. DEHAA is no longer involved in the active revision of most of this series mapping. Emphasis has shifted to on-demand digital mapping. Existing series are, however, still available and date in the main from the 1980s. A 1:50,000 scale map is produced in accordance with the national six-color specification, to cover all the settled areas of the state and the North Flinders range, in about 400 sheets. In addition a large block of the unsettled parts of the state are covered in AUSLIG published editions. A version of the 1:50,000 map data is available for 350 quads, overprinted with cadastral; the cadastral data are also separately available. Some sheets from this map have been revised. The most significant recent project has been the production of 1:25,000 scale orthophotomapping and digital terrain data for the Murray-Darling Basin Commission. An older 22 sheet 1:25,000 scale topographic series was produced in the late 1980s for the Adelaide area. Adelaide is also covered in dyeline 1:1,000 cadastral mapping. All the urban areas in the state are mapped in a 1:2,500 scale series, comprising about 1,300 sheets. These topographic-cadastral editions have 2 m contours and are sometimes published on an orthophoto base, or as a dyeline. 1:10,000 scale mapping with 5 m contours covers metropolitan Adelaide, rural towns, and irrigation area. Sheet numbering is derived from the 1:100,000 scale quadrangle: there are 50 1:10,000 for every 1:100 000, and 16 1:2,500 for each 1:10 000. DEHAA also publishes a popular range of tourist maps, as well as mapping for other state agencies. Place name data are available in hard copy or in digital versions. Tasmania The Land Information Services Division (LISD) in the Department of Environment and Land Management is responsible for the development of an integrated and centralized land information service for the state. LISD and its predecessors have been active in the production of their own hard copy and digital maps and unlike other states there has been very little Commonwealth mapping activity. LISD programs include two 1:100,000 scale series. A topographic map conforming to national specifications and with relief shown by hill-shading covers the state in 47 sheets, most dating from the 1970s, but some revision has taken place since the mid 1980s and 13 new editions were published between 1990 and 1996. A 1:100,000 scale (Land tenure index series) covers the state in 40 sheets, (marginal sheet lines from the topographic map are rationalized), and is revised on a five-year cycle. It uses a topographic base with property, forest and reserve information overprinted. The 1:25,000 scale topographic series started in 1980 has extended to most of the state: King Island was completed in 1996, Flinders Island was under production in 1997 and only a block of the southwest of Tasmania remains to be mapped. This full-color series shows both topographic and cadastral detail. A digital production flowline was started in 1995, and conversion of existing mapping is well advanced. Digital data is available for hydrography, contours, roads, cultural detail and cadastral information and a digital elevation model has also been captured. Graphical production of 1:25,000 editions is limited due to greater demand for digital data, but the map continues to be used as a base by other thematic mapping agencies in the state. Other smaller scale coverage of Tasmania compiled by LISD includes four-sheet 1:250,000 scale mapping (also available in digital form) and a single sheet tourist map. 1:500,000 scale digital coverage of road, rivers, coastline and lakes is also available. Larger-scale coverage of Hobart and the bigger towns is available as 1:5,000 scale orthophoto maps, overlaid with 5 m contours and property boundaries. This data are also being made available as digital contours, road center lines and cadastral information. In 1996 plans to set up a state digital cadastral map base were started, which will provide a seamless digital map of Tasmania's cadastral boundaries to act as a graphical interface to various state property databases. LISD also compiles a dyeline 1:100,000 scale land systems map and publishes a regularly revised Street atlas to Tasmanian towns. Victoria All the formerly separate agencies in Victoria responsible for the publication of maps and spatial data were merged in 1996 under the single parent body the Department of Natural Resources and Environment (DNRE). Many of its mapping projects are now delivered through its Land management and resource information program, including the collaboration of several formerly separate agencies. The State Mapping Agency (VICMAP) used to be responsible for surveying and mapping of Victoria; since reorganization surveying functions have been carried out by the Office of the Surveyor General, most other mapping functions have passed to Geographic Data Victoria, renamed late in 1997 as Lands Victoria (LV). All fall under the DNRE umbrella. Substantial areas of Victoria were mapped at 1:25,000 scale in the VICMAP topographic mapping program published in hard copy as a five-color line map series. Sheets mostly cover 7.5' latitude by 7.5' longitude, though some cover double this area. The series ranges in date from 1980 through to 1992, with the best coverage available for southern and eastern areas of the state. About 800 sheets are maintained. Other published VICMAP paper products include 1:50,000 scale coverage of the more remote parts of the state: only a block of about 40 double 1:50,000 sheet areas in the northwestern parts of Victoria remains to be published. Other printed products include a series of specially formatted 1:25,000 scale outdoor leisure maps of tourist and recreation areas in the state, electoral mapping of the provinces and districts and small scale coverage of Victoria at 1:500,000 in four sheets, and at 1:1,000,000 scale. Western Australia The Department of Land Administration (DOLA) is the most important mapping agency in Western Australia, and has responsibility for all legal, geographic and administrative aspects of the use of land in the state, including cadastral and topographic surveying. It relocated to purpose built headquarters in 1993. Conventional mapping includes a four-color topo-cadastral 1:50,000 scale series of the farming areas in the southwest of the state, complementing RASC topographic coverage at this scale for northwestern parts of the state, and about 200 six-color 1:25,000 scale orthophoto maps of the coastal plain for areas to the south of Geraldton. 1:25,000 scale cadastral coverage available in paper for southwestern areas. State large scale series have been compiled for urban areas, including selective 1:5,000 scale orthophoto coverage of the metropolitan area and country towns, showing relief with 2 m contours, and black and white 1:2,000 and 1:1,000 scale maps with 1 m intervals. The StreetSmart range of tourist maps is published, with indexed city and town maps of the main urban areas in the state, as well as 16 smaller scale touring maps covering most of the developed parts of Western Australia. 1:3,000,000 scale state maps are published showing topography, local authority and pastoral lease boundaries, as well as English and Japanese language versions of a development projects map. A nine-sheet 1:1,000,000 scale topographic state series was updated to 1993 and the southwest of the state is covered in a boundaries edition at 1:1,000,000 scale.

Australia

20,763 total products were found covering Australia.
Next, select filters, series, and products from the sections below the map.

Responsibility for the topographic and cadastral survey of Australia is divided between federal and state government agencies. Until 1950 there was very little national coordination between the different state surveys. After that date federal and state maps have all been produced on the UTM projection with the Australian Map Grid, and since 1973 all major producers have adopted metric standards. Official mapping relates to the Australian Geodetic Datum 1984, but moves are in hand to change to the Geocentric Datum of Australia (GDA) as the reference datum for all spatial data and map products. The period from 1965 to the close of the 1980s saw a very large effort devoted to the completion of basic scale mapping of the continent, Australia being the last inhabited continent to be mapped to modern standards. Increasingly in the 1990s the private sector became involved in the compilation and production of basic data, and digital capture of data sets to common continental standards. The Australian Surveying and Land Information Group (AUSLIG) was a business unit of the Commonwealth Department of Administrative Services until 1997, when responsibility passed to the Department of Industry, Science and Tourism. It is currently responsible for Commonwealth mapping, surveying and land information in Australia, including the publication of hard copy and digital maps, and provision of mapping to other government departments. AUSLIG acts as the Commonwealth focal point for the development of a national spatial data infrastructure. It was formed in 1988, after the merger of the former Division of National Mapping and the Australian Survey Office. Other small and medium scale federal topographic mapping of Australia was the responsibility of the Royal Australian Survey Corps (RASvy), which was disbanded in 1996 ─ military map and chart production are now carried out under Defence commercial support arrangements, RASvy residual functions are carried out by the Royal Australian Engineers, and standards and specifications are now fixed by the Directorate of Military Geographic Information. AUSLIG maintains the national official basic maps at 1:100,000 and 1:250,000 scales, which were redesignated as the (NATMAP series) in 1995. The 1:100,000 (NATMAP topographic map series) program was started in 1968 and was originally intended to cover the whole country in 3,065 seven-color maps by 1975. However this aim was scaled down to full color mapping of inhabited areas and areas of potential resource development, a total of 1,591 sheets. The remaining 1,474 sheets in the less settled interior were only taken as far as compilation plots, and from 1972 these maps have been available as orthophoto mapping. The last published sheet in the full specification was completed in 1986, while the last orthophoto compilation sheet in the interior was finished in 1988; little revision of these maps has been carried out. The whole of Australia is covered in the 1:250,000 scale (NATMAP topographic map series). Each map is derived from six 1:100,000 scale maps or orthophoto plots, the series was compiled as a joint AUSLIG and RASvy publication, editions being available either as a Joint Operations Graphic (JOG) military specification, or a conventional AUSLIG version. The 1.5° X 1° sheets have 50 m contours and hill shading. The last of the 540 sheets in the new series was published in 1988, but little revision work is being carried out. Larger scale topographic surveys have been carried out by different state mapping agencies, and sometimes by RASvy. Scales and coverages vary from state to state. Smaller scale topographic mapping is also carried out by AUSLIG. 1:1,000,000 scale coverage complying with the International map of the World (IMW) specifications and covering Australia in 49 sheets was withdrawn following the AUSLIG merger, but sheet lines are still used by several thematic series and in commercially published atlases. Soviet military topographic mapping of Australia exists at the following scales: 1:1,000,000 (56 sheets, complete coverage published 1973-1977); 1:500,000 (160 sheets, complete coverage, published 1964-1975) and city (1:25,000) topographic mapping of Adelaide, Brisbane, Canberra, Perth and Sydney published between 1981 and 1985. These products are available in print, digital raster and digital vector GIS formats from East View Geospatial. State organizations The last decade has seen a proliferation of different kinds of state-based organization concerned with the production of spatial databases and mapping to cover their particular states and organizational remits; a very great diversification from the 1970s and 1980s standard of a state mapping agency based in a lands department. All manner of agencies are now engaged in mapping activities, but the importance of larger scale standardized map series production in the different states has declined. In contrast the emphasis has shifted to coordination between the different agencies to ensure the provision of compatible data sets, with particular attention increasingly being paid to Web-based metadata interfaces, and to specific user-driven mapping programs. Cooperation between agencies takes place under the aegis of the Australia and New Zealand Land Information Council (ANZLIC) and the Intergovernmental Committee on Surveying and Mapping (ICSM) attached to AUSLIG. Cadastral, urban and earth science mapping continues to be undertaken by state agencies, and it is the mineral exploration sector which has seen the most active data collection and publication programs over the last decade. Australian Capital Territory Large scale mapping of the Capital Territory was established by the Australian Survey Office in 1972. It was responsible for the compilation of a number of topographic and cadastral map series covering the territory at scales between 1:2 500 and 1:25 000. The ACT Land Information Center (ACTLIC) within Planning and Land Management is now ACT's lead agency for the capture, management and dissemination of land information. Urban areas are covered in topographic and orthophoto series, but these maps have been superseded by digital data sets held in the ACTMAP land information system, which is linked to attribute textual cadastral data in the Planning and lease manager relational database. Since 1992 ACTMAP has evolved from being a digital cadastral database, into a comprehensive and very current land information system, held as a distributed database and supporting many planning and land administration functions in the ACT government. Fourteen graphical database themes are used for mapping purposes by the ACT Mapping Office within ACTLIC, and each year a hard copy version of the database is published as the Canberra by suburbs atlas. The digital map data from ACTMAP comprises five major interrelated themes: street address, administrative geographies, urban and rural cadastral boundaries and a roads database. Other data sets include water features, 40 m gridded terrain data, various utilities data and a topographic database. Other smaller scale mapping of ACT is issued by AUSLIG including a single-sheet 1:100,000 scale topographic map, a LANDSAT TM satellite image map coverage of the territory, and an image poster of Canberra. AGSO publishes geological and hydrogeological mapping of the Capital Territory. New South Wales The most important state mapping agency in New South Wales is the Land Information Centre (LIC) in the Department of Conservation and Land Management. LIC was established as the Central Mapping Agency (CMA) in 1947, relocated to Bathurst in the 1970s and by 1988 had completed standard map coverage of the State, comprising 1:4,000 scale cadastral coverage of urban areas, 1:25,000 scale mapping of the more densely populated eastern seaboard, (including recent parallel image mapping of areas between Sydney and Newcastle), 1:50,000 scale mapping of the central band of the state and 1:100,000 scale maps of the more sparsely populated western areas. These maps conform to Commonwealth mapping standards and are on the UTM projection. LIC also publishes small scale touring maps, 23 town and district maps, five waterways maps and six national park maps, as well as smaller scale maps of the state as a whole and an official indexed road directory of New South Wales. LIC has been at the forefront of state digital developments in the 1990s, and unlike most other state land and mapping agencies has been actively involved in overseas technical aid projects, in a number of Southeast Asian and Pacific nations. Digital data sets are held in a state-wide digital cadastral database, with topographic coverages maintained in a digital topographic database. Digital terrain data for all the areas mapped at 1:25,000 and 1:50,000 scales, customized slope and aspect maps are generated from this data. Northern Territory The Department of Lands Planning and the Environment (NTDLPE) is the territorial mapping agency. Queensland The most important surveying and mapping organization in Queensland is the Department of Natural Resources (QDNR) which was created in February 1996 following the merger of the previous Department of Lands with components of the Department of Primary Industries (QDPI). The Department of Lands had itself only been established in 1989 following a merger of four constituent bodies, including the Department of Surveying and Mapping. QDNR continues to be the principal agency in the state carrying out topographic mapping, and acts as the cadastral mapping agency for the state. It also instituted an integrated state-wide Land Information Strategy, to maximize benefit from different government digital land information databases. QDNR's current topographic production concentrates upon a program of 1:25,000 scale mapping. Data are captured from aerial coverage, and an active digital mapping program is generating hard copy true-color ortho-image maps, with some limited line enhancement, including 5 m contours, roads, the UTM grid and place names. About 500 sheets are available. Other new mapping is in, digital orthophoto mapping programs of 1:2,500 and 1:5,000 scales, carried out in the mid 1990s, for urban local authorities, chiefly in the southeastern parts of the state. The Resource Information Group of the Department for Environment Heritage and Aboriginal Affairs (DEHAA) is the state mapping agency responsible for collection and provision of data relating to South Australia's land resources. Its standard mapping program includes hard copy topographic, cadastral and scale-corrected orthophotomaps for urban and closely settled areas, with the more remote parts of the state mapped in uncorrected photomaps. DEHAA is no longer involved in the active revision of most of this series mapping. Emphasis has shifted to on-demand digital mapping. Existing series are, however, still available and date in the main from the 1980s. A 1:50,000 scale map is produced in accordance with the national six-color specification, to cover all the settled areas of the state and the North Flinders range, in about 400 sheets. In addition a large block of the unsettled parts of the state are covered in AUSLIG published editions. A version of the 1:50,000 map data is available for 350 quads, overprinted with cadastral; the cadastral data are also separately available. Some sheets from this map have been revised. The most significant recent project has been the production of 1:25,000 scale orthophotomapping and digital terrain data for the Murray-Darling Basin Commission. An older 22 sheet 1:25,000 scale topographic series was produced in the late 1980s for the Adelaide area. Adelaide is also covered in dyeline 1:1,000 cadastral mapping. All the urban areas in the state are mapped in a 1:2,500 scale series, comprising about 1,300 sheets. These topographic-cadastral editions have 2 m contours and are sometimes published on an orthophoto base, or as a dyeline. 1:10,000 scale mapping with 5 m contours covers metropolitan Adelaide, rural towns, and irrigation area. Sheet numbering is derived from the 1:100,000 scale quadrangle: there are 50 1:10,000 for every 1:100 000, and 16 1:2,500 for each 1:10 000. DEHAA also publishes a popular range of tourist maps, as well as mapping for other state agencies. Place name data are available in hard copy or in digital versions. Tasmania The Land Information Services Division (LISD) in the Department of Environment and Land Management is responsible for the development of an integrated and centralized land information service for the state. LISD and its predecessors have been active in the production of their own hard copy and digital maps and unlike other states there has been very little Commonwealth mapping activity. LISD programs include two 1:100,000 scale series. A topographic map conforming to national specifications and with relief shown by hill-shading covers the state in 47 sheets, most dating from the 1970s, but some revision has taken place since the mid 1980s and 13 new editions were published between 1990 and 1996. A 1:100,000 scale (Land tenure index series) covers the state in 40 sheets, (marginal sheet lines from the topographic map are rationalized), and is revised on a five-year cycle. It uses a topographic base with property, forest and reserve information overprinted. The 1:25,000 scale topographic series started in 1980 has extended to most of the state: King Island was completed in 1996, Flinders Island was under production in 1997 and only a block of the southwest of Tasmania remains to be mapped. This full-color series shows both topographic and cadastral detail. A digital production flowline was started in 1995, and conversion of existing mapping is well advanced. Digital data is available for hydrography, contours, roads, cultural detail and cadastral information and a digital elevation model has also been captured. Graphical production of 1:25,000 editions is limited due to greater demand for digital data, but the map continues to be used as a base by other thematic mapping agencies in the state. Other smaller scale coverage of Tasmania compiled by LISD includes four-sheet 1:250,000 scale mapping (also available in digital form) and a single sheet tourist map. 1:500,000 scale digital coverage of road, rivers, coastline and lakes is also available. Larger-scale coverage of Hobart and the bigger towns is available as 1:5,000 scale orthophoto maps, overlaid with 5 m contours and property boundaries. This data are also being made available as digital contours, road center lines and cadastral information. In 1996 plans to set up a state digital cadastral map base were started, which will provide a seamless digital map of Tasmania's cadastral boundaries to act as a graphical interface to various state property databases. LISD also compiles a dyeline 1:100,000 scale land systems map and publishes a regularly revised Street atlas to Tasmanian towns. Victoria All the formerly separate agencies in Victoria responsible for the publication of maps and spatial data were merged in 1996 under the single parent body the Department of Natural Resources and Environment (DNRE). Many of its mapping projects are now delivered through its Land management and resource information program, including the collaboration of several formerly separate agencies. The State Mapping Agency (VICMAP) used to be responsible for surveying and mapping of Victoria; since reorganization surveying functions have been carried out by the Office of the Surveyor General, most other mapping functions have passed to Geographic Data Victoria, renamed late in 1997 as Lands Victoria (LV). All fall under the DNRE umbrella. Substantial areas of Victoria were mapped at 1:25,000 scale in the VICMAP topographic mapping program published in hard copy as a five-color line map series. Sheets mostly cover 7.5' latitude by 7.5' longitude, though some cover double this area. The series ranges in date from 1980 through to 1992, with the best coverage available for southern and eastern areas of the state. About 800 sheets are maintained. Other published VICMAP paper products include 1:50,000 scale coverage of the more remote parts of the state: only a block of about 40 double 1:50,000 sheet areas in the northwestern parts of Victoria remains to be published. Other printed products include a series of specially formatted 1:25,000 scale outdoor leisure maps of tourist and recreation areas in the state, electoral mapping of the provinces and districts and small scale coverage of Victoria at 1:500,000 in four sheets, and at 1:1,000,000 scale. Western Australia The Department of Land Administration (DOLA) is the most important mapping agency in Western Australia, and has responsibility for all legal, geographic and administrative aspects of the use of land in the state, including cadastral and topographic surveying. It relocated to purpose built headquarters in 1993. Conventional mapping includes a four-color topo-cadastral 1:50,000 scale series of the farming areas in the southwest of the state, complementing RASC topographic coverage at this scale for northwestern parts of the state, and about 200 six-color 1:25,000 scale orthophoto maps of the coastal plain for areas to the south of Geraldton. 1:25,000 scale cadastral coverage available in paper for southwestern areas. State large scale series have been compiled for urban areas, including selective 1:5,000 scale orthophoto coverage of the metropolitan area and country towns, showing relief with 2 m contours, and black and white 1:2,000 and 1:1,000 scale maps with 1 m intervals. The StreetSmart range of tourist maps is published, with indexed city and town maps of the main urban areas in the state, as well as 16 smaller scale touring maps covering most of the developed parts of Western Australia. 1:3,000,000 scale state maps are published showing topography, local authority and pastoral lease boundaries, as well as English and Japanese language versions of a development projects map. A nine-sheet 1:1,000,000 scale topographic state series was updated to 1993 and the southwest of the state is covered in a boundaries edition at 1:1,000,000 scale.

Australia

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